Good News in History, June 9

Good News in History, June 9

Cole porter-wikipedia

On this day 125 years ago, composer and songwriter Cole Porter was born. Although classically trained, he was attracted to musical theater and wrote both music and lyrics for his songs, including for the Tony Award-winning show Kiss Me, Kate. He wrote the popular standards Night and Day, I Get a Kick Out of You, I’ve Got You Under My Skin, Let’s Do It, and In the Still of the Night. WATCH a clip of Kevin Kline playing Porter in the bio-pic film, De-Lovely… (1891)

MORE Good News on this Day:

  • Alice Ramsey, 22, a mom from Hackensack, New Jersey, became the first woman to drive across the United States (3,800 miles) – spending 59 days in a Maxwell automobile (1909)
  • Army counsel Joseph Welch confronted Sen. Joseph McCarthy on the 30th day of Senate hearings investigating Communist activity in the Army, saying, “Have you no sense of decency, sir? At long last, have you left no sense of decency?” —at which point, the Senate the gallery erupted in applause (1954)
  • The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints opened the priesthood to “all worthy men” ending 148-years of exclusion for black men (1978)
  • The first live broadcast of Britain’s Parliament – the House of Commons – was televised by BBC Radio and commercial stations (1975)
  • The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and NATO signed a peace treaty in the end of the Kosovo War (1999)

And, on this day in 1915, the musician and innovator Les Paul was born in Waukesha, Wisconsin. A natural engineer and phenomenal musician, Lester Polsfuss, as a teen, invented his own speaker and one of the earliest solid body guitars–carving it out of a piece of railroad plank. His Les Paul guitars, made famous by Gibson, were favorites of rock legends worldwide. He is the father of multi-track recording, and guitar effects—experiments funded by Bing Crosby. His lightening-fast picking in jazz, blues, and country styles earned Les Paul a television show and accolades too numerous to mention. In his 90s, he still performed weekly in Manhattan jazz clubs, despite numerous disabilities. He died in 2009, three years after earning his last two Grammy awards.