Good News in History, June 23

Good News in History, June 23

 

Happy Birthday to singer-songwriter Jason Mraz who turns 40-years-old today. After growing up in Virginia, he released his debut studio album in 2002, which contained the hit single “The Remedy (I Won’t Worry)”. Mraz has won two Grammy Awards and his second hit, “I’m Yours,” was nominated for two others. His style evokes the influence of Brazilian music, from its swaying and jaunty rhythms to the use of nylon string guitars. WATCH an upbeat Mraz music video… (1977)

The eternally sunny Mraz also runs his own sustainable, certified organic farm with his wife on their ranch outside of San Diego, growing thousands of coffee bushes and selling the fruits from 40 varieties of avocado trees. (Click to see the full photo by Tommy John, CC)

MORE Good News From this Day:

  • Jews were given permission to settle in Kiev by Empress Catherine II (1794)
  • Frederick Douglass became the first African-American nominated for US president (1888)
  • Women ministers were accepted by the Dutch Reformed Church (1958)
  • The FDA approved birth control pills for contraceptive use in the general public (1960)
  • Pope John Paul II met with banned union leader Lech Walesa, the founder and leader of Solidarity, Poland’s independent trade union movement (1983)
  • Hearst Castle became the first California state park to operate with 100% natural-gas-powered buses— clean-fuel transportation that began moving one million visitors up the mountain every year, while reducing harmful air emissions by up to 75 percent over the old noisy diesel buses (2001)
  • Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean launched his maverick campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination that would become the model for grassroots internet campaigning and raise $50 million mostly in small donations under fifty dollars (2003)
  • Nik Wallenda became the first person to successfully walked across the Grand Canyon on a tight rope. (2013)

Wilma Rudolph-publicdomain-Giuseppina_leone

 

And, on this day in 1940, Wilma Rudolph was born prematurely at 4.5 pounds (2.0 kg). Despite a polio virus, infantile paralysis, and wearing a metal brace that twisted her leg for years, the Tennessee sprinter became the fastest woman in the world. She won an Olympic bronze medal at age 16, and four years later 3 gold medals in the 1960 Rome Olympics. Her international stature raised the status of women in sports, and she campaigned for civil rights and women’s rights in America. (Click to enlarge the photo, right, by Giuseppina Leone)

COMMENTS

  1. Wow, the fourth anniversary of Howard Dean’s courageous and inspiring run for President. How quickly these years have passed!!!

    Love what you’re doing with you dream site, Geri. So glad I found it recently, and so happy to read it in my RSS feeds every day. Sending you lots of love from your old Dean campaign pal!