Good News in History, May 11

Good News in History, May 11

 

 

On this day 90 years ago, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was founded, with the goal of advancing the arts and sciences of movies. Beyond awarding student scholarships and maintaining film libraries, The Academy is known around the world for its annual Academy Awards, now officially known as “The Oscars”. (1927)

MORE Good News on this Day:

  • Minnesota was admitted as the 32nd U.S. State (1858)
  • Andrew Carnegie donated $1.5 million to build the Peace Palace, near the Hague and home to the Permanent Court of Arbitration, peace library and grounds (1904)
  • Charges are dismissed against Daniel Ellsberg for releasing the Pentagon Papers to the press, government cited for misconduct (1973)
  • The rock group Queen wrapped up their 46-date ‘News Of The World’ tour playing the first of three sold-out nights at Wembley arena in London (1978)
  • More than 170 countries decided to extend the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty indefinitely and without conditions (1995)

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And, on this day in 1910, the U.S. Congress established Glacier National Park in Montana. Along the Canadian border, the park encompasses over 1 million acres, two mountain ranges, 130 lakes, more than 1,000 different plants, and hundreds of animal species, including the threatened grizzly bear and Canadian lynx. –Photo by MountainWalrus-CC

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Happy Birthday to Eric Burdon, the lead singer for The Animals on ‘House of the Rising Sun‘, who turns 76 today. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee also sang on ‘Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood’ and ‘We Got to Get Out of the Place’. Burdon has often toured in the last decade and is set to make an emotional return to Newcastle with The Animals this autumn –the English city where the band formed in 1963, before becoming part of the British Invasion that took America by storm. Burdon also joined the band WAR to help create such hits as ‘Spill the Wine’, ‘Paint it Black’, and ‘Why Can’t We Be Friends?’ (1941) –Eric Burdon Photo by MitchD50, CC

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