Good News in History, October 6

Good News in History, October 6

On this day 10 years ago, Englishman Jason Lewis completed the first human-powered circumnavigation of the globe. Using a pedal boat, roller blades, bicycles, kayak, and his feet, the adventurer and sustainability campaigner finished the harrowing journey in a little over 13 years. His award-winning books describe how he survived a crocodile attack, blood poisoning, malaria, incarceration for espionage, and was hit by a drunk driver and left with two broken legs in Colorado. Lewis had never crossed an ocean before. Nor had he roller bladed, kayaked, or rode a bike for more than a few miles. WATCH his Video… (2007)

in the process of completing his ‘Expedition 360’, Lewis also became the first person to cross North America on inline skates, and the first to cross the Pacific Ocean by pedal power. Together with Stevie Smith, Lewis completed the first crossing of the Atlantic Ocean from mainland Europe to North America by human power. He successfully ended his 4,833-day expedition, having travelled 46,505 miles (74,842 km). –Photo by Tammie6123, CC

MORE Good News on this Day:

  • Jacopo Peri’s Euridice, the earliest surviving opera, premiered in Florence (1600)
  • Thomas Edison projected his first motion picture (1889)
  • The Moulin Rouge cabaret, birthplace of the can-can (a scandalous dance for the times), opened in Paris—and the dance venue still entertains tourists today (1889)
  • The High Court of Australia presided for the first time (1903)
  • The Jazz Singer opened in theaters, the first prominent talking movie (1927)
  • Pope John Paul II joined Jimmy Carter, becoming the first pontiff to visit the White House (1979)
  • Fiji became a republic (1987)
  • The US Supreme Court effectively allowed same-sex marriage to proceed in eleven states when it refused to review three federal court rulings that overturned state bans (2014)

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And, on this day in 2000, street celebrations erupted in Yugoslavia as the last remaining dictator in Europe, President Slobodan Milosevic, resigned following a public uprising over allegations of vote-rigging during elections. A large wheel-loader ramming a government building led to the rebellion being called, the Bulldozer Revolution.